Sunday, July 31, 2011

Spliced In Day 31




During the month of July, There was featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and their respective writers.


Spliced In Ends Today - Day 31


...Is there a place for Kigo in Caribbean haiku expression; maybe so maybe not, however, Caribbean Kigo attempts at linking certain words and phrases which have explicit meanings relative to our sense of taste, smell, sight, and passions; to particular times during the year...Read more...

Labels: , , , ,

Saturday, July 30, 2011

Spliced In Day 30




During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 30


...Hai roughly means a little joke, a humorous instant, a sly observation, a gentle smile, happy laughter, innocent irony, ~ Scholars say that this word is very difficult to translate. "Ku" is more clearly poetry ...


Read through this listing Etymology And Terminology - Narayanan Raghunathan

Labels: , , , , ,

Friday, July 29, 2011

Spliced In Day 29



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers. (but today enjoy a delightful tale)


Spliced In - Day 28

...He did his homework
in haiku. Essays, reports.
His mother hid them....:...


Read Haiku Story A touching tale of father and son, conflict and reconciliation, told entirely in haiku form!

Labels: , , , , ,

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Spliced In Day 28



I heard yesterday evening of the passing on Monday of haiku poet Betty Kaplan; my sympathies to family and friends; Dear lady; the haiku community mourns your passing

During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 28

...It is also important to think of Haiku as being built with images. Solid, concrete, images as opposed to abstractions. For instance “teardrop” is concrete, as opposed to the word “sad” which is abstract. The image should call the intent of the
poet into the imagination of the reader, who should then be able to feel it and experience it for themselves. To use the often over-used maxim; haiku should show not tell...:...


Read the essay The Art of Haiku by Lou Freshwater

Labels: , , , , , ,

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Spliced In Day 27



...Haiku has been described as a moment in time captured in words that somehow captures more than the words might seem to convey. When the poet and the reader connect and the deeper meaning is seen, it is called an "aha" moment..:...


Read more here... from Soji

Labels: , , , ,

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Spliced In Day 26



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 25

...Haiku is a minimalist form of poetry. The writer has 17 or fewer syllables through which to convey an experience.:...



Read the essay Haiku - A Definition by Ray Rasmussen

Labels: , , , ,

Monday, July 25, 2011

Spliced In Day 25



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 25

...From Hokku to Haiku has been a long journey. The early translators of haiku into English were R.H. Blyth and Harold G. Henderson. Blyth’s four volumes of haiku were published in 1949 and Henderson’s in 1959. Both these translators differ in their views about haiku. While Blyth believed that Zen is at the center of haiku, Henderson stated :"Primarily, it (haiku) is a poem; and being a poem it
is intended to express and to evoke emotion.:...


Read the essay The River Returns: A Review Essay by Asha Viswas

Labels: , , , ,

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Spliced In Day 24



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 24

...Of course, any serious poem-maker, worker with words and images, may certainly do as she or he pleases. Professional poets perhaps push beyond the boundaries of our expectations more often than haiku poets. Perhaps we will learn a thing or two by looking at their work—serious, humorous, or both at once—whether we think this or that poem is a haiku or not.:...



Read the essay A Poet's Haiku: Paul Muldoon by William J. Higginson

Labels: , , , ,

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Spliced In Day 23


During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 23

...3. Haiku ISN'T poetics (in the English-language-poetry sense) but IS pure poetry. 4. Haiku ISN'T simile or metaphor. Simile and metaphor turn haiku into English-poetics:...



Read the essay The ISN\'Ts of Haiku by Lorraine Ellis Harr

Labels: , , , ,

Friday, July 22, 2011

Spliced In Day 22



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 22

...In an interview with Roseliep published in 1979 Sister Mary Thomas Eulberg asked him about how a priest could be writing such evocative, sometimes erotic, love poetry. “To talk about that,” Roseliep said, “I should return for a moment to that Catholic-poetry period of mine, and I can briefly tell you how it was inevitable that I needed a fresh theme. In those early days I was writing about the Mass, the sacraments, parish experiences, religious encounters of all dimensions in people, nature, anywhere.” He added:...

moth
nor lover’s breath
disturb my candle

Read the essay The Love Haiku of Raymond Roseliep by Randy Brooks

Labels: , , , ,

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Spliced In Day 21



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 21

...The majority of literary haiku published in English today are not 5-7-5 (even in Geppo). In the second edition of Cor van den Heuvel’s The Haiku Anthology (Touchstone, 1986), 88.2 percent of the poems are not 5-7-5. And in Bruce Ross’s Haiku Moment (Tuttle, 1993), an even greater 96.5 percent of the poems are not 5-7-5. A similar dominance of non-5-7-5 poems prevails in most of the leading English-language haiku journals...


Read the essay What Is a Syllable by Michael Dylan Welch

Labels: , , , ,

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Spliced In Day 20




During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 20

...To appreciate haiku it is necessary to acquire a taste for it. The first time I tried Japanese Green Tea I thought it very odd stuff. Most Westerners I know have had a similar reaction. I'm used to Green Tea by now but I'm still intrigued by the difference between Green Tea and English Tea. How can they both be tea? How can haiku and what-we-call-poetry both be poetry? ...


Read the essay Haiku and related forms by Martin Lucas

Labels: , , , ,

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Spliced In Day 19



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 19

...When a haijin (a writer of haiku) writes a haiku about something wabi sabi she will often attempt to capture both its transient beauty AND the abiding qualities within the beauty, ...


Read the essay Wabi Sabi in Haiku by Richard R. Powell

Labels: , , , ,

Monday, July 18, 2011

Spliced In Day 18 and Nelson Mandela Day


Today's post has been edited to include a quote of Nelson Mandela as he celebrates today his 93rd birthday
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Nelson Mandela


Read Take Mandela at his word Read also S.Africa cheers Mandela’s 93rd birthday




During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.





Spliced In - Day 18

...One of the first three civilization on earth, China, during a period of colonization, conquered the group Islands that’s today called Japan. The Chinese introduced writing, literature (including poetry), Buddhism, Taoism, and the teachings of Confucius to Japan. As years passed by, and after many wars, Japan became a unified nation ruled by a succession of Emperors thought by the Japanese to be gods. Early poetry in Japan were written in Chinese, and later in Japanese. Many of the great waka and Haiku poets including Basho and Fujiwara no Teika made references to Chinese poetry especially those from the Tang Dynasty. Some even copied lines and added lines of their own to them. Some excerpts from Tang Dynasty poetry that influenced Japanese poetic thought and aesthetics...


Read the essay The Chinese Influence on Japanese Short Form Poetry by Robert D. Wilson

Labels: , , , , , ,

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Spliced In Day 17



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 17

...frustrated with trying to apply Japanese kigo to this hemisphere and continent I began researching potential Australian kigo/season words. I carefully reviewed haiku written by Australians and sought suggestions from both haijin and those unfamiliar with haiku. I was surprised to find only a handful of seasonal designators valid for all of Australia; most of these were events in human affairs such as Australia Day, Anzac Day, Melbourne Cup. I abandoned the project in favour of ....

Read the essaySearch for the Golden Boomerang ~ or Not Finding Australian Kigo By John Bird

Labels: , , , ,

Saturday, July 16, 2011

Spliced In Day 16


During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 16

If somebody asked me to choose between the sun and the moon as a place to live, I would choose the moon. In my mind, there are highways with 10 lanes on the sun, but the moon has alleys and narrow streets I can explore on foot. For me, the sun is a destination, but the moon is a gateway and a peep-hole to an unknown world...

Read the essayMoon In The Haiku Tradition By Fay Aoyagi

Labels: , , , ,

Friday, July 15, 2011

Spliced In Day 15



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 15

The pilgrim-poet Bashô called it looking for a “glimpse of the underglimmer.” Goethe called it the “holy longing.” For the Sufis it was the ability to see with “the eyes of the heart.” Emerson looked for “the undersong” in things. For the Muslims it was Mecca and for Christians and Jews it was a journey to Jerusalem. For the holy men of Japan or hijiri it was following the solitary way. For Buddhists paying homage to Buddha it was visiting those sites of Buddha’s birth and enlightenment. For Australian aborigines this journey was called a “walk-about” which follows the dreamtracks or songlines of the ancients. For American Indians it was a vision quest. A pilgrimage is a journey to a sacred place; on a more poetic level the term pilgrim has its roots in the Latin per agrum or “through the field.”

Read the essay The Return Message: A Pilgrim’s Way of Longing by Marjorie Buettner


This post has been edited to correct authorship of the featured haiku which i credited to Basho, but really, is the work of Marjorie Buettner; thank you Marjorie for alerting me
much love
gillena

Labels: , , , ,

Thursday, July 14, 2011

Spliced In Day 14



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 14

...one finds a selection of elements based on an inward poetic aesthetic; the main images are novel and captivating; in terms of images alone, this is a fine microcosmic shasei, much in the manner Shiki has elucidated: at first glance, the haiku presents a realistic impression. However, this haiku goes beyondshasei and realism, utilizing four modes of disjunction, which may be termed "perceptual disjunction," "misreading as meaning," "disjunction of semantic expectation," and "linguistic oxymoron." We can find no kireji or clearly defined “traditional” juxtaposition of images in this haiku; in its form, the haiku is strikingly similar to a simple declarative sentence. What makes this short declaration an excellent haiku?

Read the essayDisjunctive Dragonfly by Richard Gilbert

Labels: , , , ,

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Spliced In Day 13




During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 13

...the human Gautama Siddharta, the future Buddha, during a period of intense asceticism in the mountains near Bodhgaya (India). It usually shows him in sitting position, with no more flesh on the ribs after intense fasting. The blood vessels show on the arms and neck, he has a long beard and is dressed in the ascetics robe of not very much. His eyes are hollow from lack of sleep and food. This type of statue is also called the "Fasting Buddha" or the "Starving Buddha"...
Read Azalea and Shaka

Labels: , , , ,

Tuesday, July 12, 2011

Spliced In Day 12


visit alsoSHIKI moon haiku


During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 12

...There is a darker side of universalism as well, which I am relating with internationalism, or globalism. Now that haiku as an international phenomenon has left its nest of Japan and is permeating through the global sieve, what we stand to lose is the local. There is tension between the need to communicate to the widest possible global audience or reader, and the local particulars of language, culture, custom, season, flora, fauna, etc...


Read the essayUniversalism vs. Particularism in International Haiku by Richard Gilbert

Labels: , , , ,

Monday, July 11, 2011

Spliced In Day 11




During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 11


...Kenneth Yashuda asserts that a haiku is a poem that: Arises from "the haiku attitude [which] is a readiness for an experience for its own sake." Expresses "a haiku moment" whose "quality is eternal, for in this state, man and his environment are one unified whole, in which there is no sense of time"...


Empty nest —
a chipped blue cup
of bitter tea
J. Zimmerman (Geppo, September 2010)


Read the essay The Haiku Verse Form by J. Zimmerman

Labels: , , , ,

Sunday, July 10, 2011

Spliced In Day 10



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 10


Around the old monk
The orphan children gather.
O Holy Night!


...Takeda, who studied for the priesthood in Boston and New York, began writing haiku 40 years ago, when he was an English teacher in a suburban Tokyo high school. Only in the last decade has he seriously begun to explore the Christian possibilities of the form. "I realized," he recalls...


Read Worship: Hymns in Haiku

Labels: , , , ,

Saturday, July 09, 2011

Spliced In Day 9



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 9


...The fact that the smallest literary form - haiku - has the most rules never ceases to amaze and astound. The only real comfort one can find in this situation is the concept that this affords a wider range of rules from which a writer can pick and choose. You cannot follow all of the rules and several of them are so contradictory that there is no way to honor them both at once.You must always choose. In order to make a choice, you have to understand the reasons and methods...

Read the essay Fragment and Phrase Theory by Jane Reichhold

Labels: , , , ,

Friday, July 08, 2011

Spliced In Day 8




During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 8


...Shiki suggested, that once a basic saijiki, a catalogue of seasonal topics, has been established, it might become a backdrop against which varying ways of treating common phenomena could develop. Each poet´s individual sensitivity, makoto, might be adding a varying focus to reoccuring situations and events...

Read the essay Waterscapes & Evanescent Seasons: Aspects of Swedish Haiku by Helga Härle

Labels: , , , ,

Thursday, July 07, 2011

Spliced In Day 7



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 7

from the future
a wind arrives
that blows the waterfall apart

-- Ban'ya Natsuishi, A Future Waterfall

...If we cavil, as the objectivists might, that this is not a sketch from nature, then we have missed the opportunity to dwell in that which makes us unique in nature—the imagination. And at the same time, this imagination, part of us, is part of nature as well. Literature is capable of giving us a clue, not to what is true, but to what we think we're being true to. And while that's not everything, it's a lot, and it makes our taking pains to find ba and maintain it worth the effort...

Read the essay So:ba by Jim Kacian

Labels: , , , ,

Wednesday, July 06, 2011

Spliced In Day 6




During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 6


three hundred, sixty-five
unwritten pages
--Moira Richards, South Africa

...In that space and silence – sheer magic happens. When the mind quietens and dwells on these silences after a heard piece of music or poetry – what happens is that we emotionally plunge deeper. Touching something that cannot be explained in words, a feeling so fleeting . . . but something that can be recalled even years later...


Read Aesthetic contemplation on the rasa-kasen renku a tomegaki and read also The Awakening : a kasen renku incorporating the Indian Nava Rasa (nine essences)

Labels: , , , ,

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

Spliced In Day 5



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the
websites and to their respective writers.


Spliced In - Day 5

ants out of a hole —
when did I stop playing
the red toy piano?
--Fay Aoyagi

... In a great haiku we sense the poet finding out something in the process of composition, not reporting on a thing that has been previously mentally digested...

Read the essay Something with Wings: Fay Aoyagi's Haiku of Inner Landscape 1

Labels: , , , ,

Monday, July 04, 2011

Spliced In Day 4



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 4


...Most important -- haiku can take you out of the dominant, instrumental way of relating to the world: to nature in general, and other beings, including humans. What does this mean...

Read the essayEcstasy of the Moment and the Depth of Time

Labels: , , , ,

Sunday, July 03, 2011

Spliced In Day 3



During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 3

...The most important characteristic of haiku is how it conveys, through implication and suggestion, a moment of keen perception and perhaps insight into nature or human nature. Haiku does not state this insight, however, but implies it. In the last hundred years—in Japanese and English-language haiku—implication has been achieved most successfully through the use of objective imagery...

spring breeze—
the pull of her hand
as we near the pet store
--Michael Dylan Welch, Sammamish, Washington

Read the essay Becoming a Haiku Poet

Labels: , , , ,

Saturday, July 02, 2011

Spliced In Day 2


During the month of July There will be featured here at Lunch Break haiku related essays; original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 2

... Whether they are poems drenched in moodiness, poems that gleam with outright beauty, poems of everyday life, poems with a light humor, poems depicting a cameo of the delicacy of life–or of its harshness, all derive their extraordinary power and depth from the variously utilized aesthetics intrinsic to their composition. It is these which bestow significance from overtones that go beyond the simply presented images. These are at the core of Basho's "surplus meaning" (yojo). These move the poems toward universality.

The sea darkens;
The voices of the wild ducks
Are faintly white
--Basho

read the essay The Narrow Thread by Anita Virgil Copyright © Anita Virgil 2004

Labels: , , , ,

Friday, July 01, 2011

Spliced In Day 1



During the month of July, there will be featured here at Lunch Break, haiku related essays; the original copyright remains with the websites and to their respective writers.

Spliced In - Day 1
In 1916, Julien Vocance published “Cent visions de guerre” followed in 1917 by ninety haikai in La Grande revue. In the middle of World War I, this soldier decided to materialize his emotions and impressions of life in the trenches in the form of haiku.

Ma tête à peine rentrée,
Un moustique siffle et soudain
La crête de terre s’éboule.

My head hardly inside
A mosquito whizzes and suddenly
The tuft of earth falls in.


Dans les vertebres
Du cheval mal enfoui
Mon pied fait: floche…

Among the vertebrae
Of the badly buried horse
My foot goes: flosh…

¸.•´¯)¸.•**•.

“A haiku can be compared neither to a Greek or Latin distich, nor to a French quatrain. It is neither a “thought”, nor a “word”, nor a “proverb”; an epigram in neither the modern sense nor in the antique, which is rather an inscription. It is the simplest picture, in three movements of the brush, a sketch which is a brief touch or impression…In his study of the haikai, Mr Basil Hall Chamberlain calls
them “the lyric epigrams of Japan”. read the essay The Development of French Haiku in the First Half of the 20th Century: Historical Perspectives by Bertrand Agostini

Labels: , , , ,